Believe it or not, the Galaxy S9 might be here before we know it.

It seems like just yesterday that the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ were released, but they might be on the way out soon according to VentureBeat's Evan Blass who claims the Galaxy S9 and S9+ will be unveiled in January at CES 2018. Blass, who goes by [@evleaks on Twitter] is widely known for his track record with leaking news on unannounced smartphones. While the announcement is not confirmed by Samsung, chances are this is probably correct.

The devices, allegedly codenamed Star 1 and Star 2, are shaping up to most likely be minor revisions to the current S8 design. While we're looking at an announcement in January, the official release is likely not until March, keeping in line with past Galaxy S iterations, though the announcement would be a little earlier than normal.

These devices will likely have the same display sizes as seen on this year's models (5.8 inches on the S8 and 6.2 inches on the S8 Plus). Unsurprisingly, they are said to support 10nm CPU tech, so the US variants will likely feature the upcoming Snapdragon 845, and Exynos for pretty much everywhere else.

Interestingly, the S9+ will likely have 6GB of RAM, as opposed to the smaller S9 have 4GB, not unlike the S8 versus the Note 8. The S9+ will feature dual cameras, whereas the S9 will only feature one. As expected, they will come with 64GB of included storage, and an SD slot for expansion. Both units will feature a 3.5mm headphone jack and feature the addition of AKG stereo speakers, a welcome upgrade over the single speaker of the current Galaxy lineup.

Samsung is also said to be moving the fingerprint scanner under the camera sensor, so it should be a bit easier to access as well. A backwards-compatible DeX dock is also rumoured for these devices.

It seems the Samsung Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus are shaping up to be fairly minor upgrades with some interesting changes. Again, we should see a formal launch in March. What do you think of the Galaxy S9 so far? Let us know in the comments!

via AndroidPolice