Google is investing large sums to ensure that Windows goes the way of the dinosaur in schools.

A startup by the name of Neverware, who convert old, legacy computer hardware into Chromebooks, have raised a new round of investment from none other than Google themselves. The investment, which is estimated to be in excess of $6.5 million, is a promising sign of Google backing those companies that are committed to their platform.

Neverware, a NYC startup born in 2011, was originally focused on repurposing old laptops into virtual machines running the latest version of Windows. However, this posed a series of limitations surrounding the virtual logistics of implementing this tech and central server-based infrastructure within their target market; the education sector. This new direction, which they formally turned towards in 2015, gained traction as Chromebooks were already rising in popularity across the US education sector due to their low costs and cross-service synergy, as well as the ability to implement key enterprise and education features such as restricting access to certain features.

This quote from The Verge explains why this solution has gained popularity, and why more and more schools are leveraging it:

CloudReady (Neverware's software solution) is built on the same open-source technology as Google's Chrome OS. IT teams from corporations or schools that decide to use Neverware also get to leverage integration with ChromeEnterprise through Google's cloud-based Admin console, simplifying and unifying remote management of the disparate models in their fleets.

This move shows that Google is committed to helping the companies that are helping shape the future of Google's hybrid operating system. Chrome OS has definitely gained traction across the education sector, especially so in the US; and Neverware's solutions are being used in over 1100 schools, so it's no surprise Google is committing to assist Neverware for the foreseeable future. All things considered, Microsoft will definitely need to watch their backs, especially in the education sector.

What do you guys think? Are you interested in solutions like this one? Do you think Chrome OS will replace Windows in schools completely? Drop a comment below with your thoughts or post over in the forums.