Magisk is an extremely versatile and popular root tool that has risen to popularity in recent years to the point where it's our recommended root method in our how-to-root guide. It just scored an update.

Magisk offers systemless root that is (usually) not detected by SafetyNet tamper protection and offers an array of modification modules to customise your device in any way you may wish. And it just received an update.

Developer topjohnwu from the XDA Developer Forums has published Magisk update 14.1 today, which brings a number of significant additions, and the most noteworthy of these is official support for devices with A/B partitioning schemes.

For those who don't know, Google introduced the A/B partitioning scheme last year with Android Nougat, for OTA updates that allow for a fully working system partition to run while updates take place in the background- in effect making them more seamless. Up until now, devices with A/B partitioning schemes like the Google Pixel/Pixel XL, the Moto Z2 force, etc. lacked official support for Magisk due to the nature of Magisk's systemless root mounting. However, this update fixes the issue.

A number of changes had to be made to Magisk to accommodate the A/B partitioning scheme. However, Magisk supporting the new update system means that these devices will be able to seamlessly update OTA while preserving their Magisk installation, which is a particularly advantageous addition.

Other than that, the only significant changes are some of the modifications to the Magic Mount mechanism - it no longer uses dummy directories– reducing the number of meaningless mounts and accumulated cache.

Have you been waiting for an update like this one before pushing the button on installing Magisk for your Pixel/Pixel XL? Or have you been living under a rock for the last year or so and have only just become aware of Magisk? Either way, the installation method remains the same – you either install it through a custom recovery it or you allow Magisk Manager to create a custom boot image for you.

We cover the first method (which we recommend) in our comprehensive root guide here and you can grab the update from here.

If you have any more questions about Magisk or the root method itself, leave a comment or post on our forums, where we can help out if you need more support.

Update: